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Digiscoping

You can view my blog posts about digiscoping here and you can also bring me to your event or festival to give digiscoping workshops and field trips.  I do them all over the country, here’s a blog post from one that I did in Utah at The Great Salt Lake Bird Festival.

This is the equipment Sharon uses for digiscoping (using a digital camera with your scope or binoculars).  The scope I use is:

For the camera, I’ve used several.  My favorite adapter for mounting a camera to my scope is the Swarovski Digital Camera Adapter-Zoom Eyepiece.  It allows me to view wildlife through the scope and quickly mount a camera and get a photo.  I’ve used SEVERAL different types of cameras.  I started with point and shoot pocket cameras:

This is the full digiscoping set up that I used with a Fuji FinePix E900 and Swarovski 80mm ATS HD Spotting Scope. I chose the Fuji FinePix E900 because I was looking for a camera that works well for digiscoping but also will take decent up close shots for when I’m at a bird banding station. This camera will also take short videos, too. At the time I got my scope, it was one of the best models to use for digiscoping. That changes about every six months and alas, this camera is no longer available.

 

This is my camera with both adapters attached to it. The silver tube is the Fujifilm AR-FXE02 Lens Adapter that you can get with the camera and the black piece is the Swarovski Digital Camera Adapter-Zoom Eyepiece that you can order for the Swarovski spotting scopes. This adapter is the easiest to use because it slides quickly and easily off the spotting scope, and is not as futzy as others available.

digiscoped gull

Here’s one of my very first images I digiscoped–my very first day with the set up!

I currently use a digital SLR camrea, a Nikon D40.  It can’t do video but I still have a Canon PowerShot A570 for that (it’s good but I liked my Fuji better).  I’m currently trying to save to get a digital SLR that does video.

If you are interested in digiscoping, spend as much money as you can afford on the scope; it pays off in the long run. Get the adapter that the scope company makes for your scope. Once you have chosen your scope, ask the optic company which cameras work best with their scopes and adapters. Check around on the internet for review or comment from people who have used their camera. Take your scope to a camera store and ask and employee to help you test cameras with your scope–I usually head to National Camera Exchange with my scope and adapter in hand.  Here are some photos.

Point and Shoot photos that have been digiscoped.

Pileated Woodpecker

Sandhill Crane

Indigo Bunting

Here are videos I’ve taken with the point and shoots:

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Golden-winged Warbler

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Pileated  Woodpecker

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Prothonotary Warbler

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Hooded Merganser

Here are some of my images taken with a digital SLR:

Collared Aracari

Bohemian Waxwing